Texas Wedge Golf Lesson

In this video, Dean Reinmuth shares a valuable tip for hitting short shots around the edge of the green by explaining the Texas wedge. One of the key factors in successfully executing these shots is reading the lie of the ball. By understanding the lie, you can determine the type of shot to hit. While some players opt for a flop shot with an open-faced wedge, Dean suggests an alternative shot that is easier for the average player. This shot is commonly known as the “Texas wedge,” and it involves using your putter to get the ball airborne and roll it up to the flat part of the green.

Texas Wedge Technique

To execute the Texas wedge shot, Dean demonstrates the proper technique. He advises placing your hands farther in front on the putter and bringing the putter up more abruptly. Then, with a gentle tap, you aim to make contact with the top of the ball. By using this technique, you can avoid the common mistakes of hitting the ball too heavy or sculling it across the green. This shot gives you a better chance of getting the ball up and down, ultimately saving you a shot or two.

When to Use the Texas Wedge Shot

The Texas wedge shot is particularly useful when the grass is smooth. However, Dean shows us how to adapt this shot when the ball is sitting between two humps of grass. Instead of using a traditional wedge, he suggests using your putter to navigate this tricky lie. By tapping down on the top of the ball, the putter will get the ball airborne, allowing it to hop over the grass and roll up to the flat part of the green.

This technique is a great option for the average player who may struggle with the flop shot. It requires less skill and precision, making it easier to execute. By using your putter in this way, you can confidently approach these short shots around the edge of the green.

Texas Wedge Golf Lesson

In this video, Dean Reinmuth shares a valuable tip for hitting short shots around the edge of the green by explaining the Texas wedge. One of the key factors in successfully executing these shots is reading the lie of the ball. By understanding the lie, you can determine the type of shot to hit. While some players opt for a flop shot with an open-faced wedge, Dean suggests an alternative shot that is easier for the average player. This shot is commonly known as the “Texas wedge,” and it involves using your putter to get the ball airborne and roll it up to the flat part of the green.

Texas Wedge Technique

To execute the Texas wedge shot, Dean demonstrates the proper technique. He advises placing your hands farther in front on the putter and bringing the putter up more abruptly. Then, with a gentle tap, you aim to make contact with the top of the ball. By using this technique, you can avoid the common mistakes of hitting the ball too heavy or sculling it across the green. This shot gives you a better chance of getting the ball up and down, ultimately saving you a shot or two.

When to Use the Texas Wedge Shot

The Texas wedge shot is particularly useful when the grass is smooth. However, Dean shows us how to adapt this shot when the ball is sitting between two humps of grass. Instead of using a traditional wedge, he suggests using your putter to navigate this tricky lie. By tapping down on the top of the ball, the putter will get the ball airborne, allowing it to hop over the grass and roll up to the flat part of the green.

This technique is a great option for the average player who may struggle with the flop shot. It requires less skill and precision, making it easier to execute. By using your putter in this way, you can confidently approach these short shots around the edge of the green.

We did some shopping for you. See these deals today.

Callaway 300 Pro
Golf Net
Get Chrome Soft
True Swing

You probably think I’m crazy if I told you to swing WITHOUT your hands, right? 

Golf’s #1 female instructor has already used it to help more than 54,000 amateurs improve their contact, accuracy, and distance… Learn More Here

RECOMMENDED

Conclusion

In summary, reading the lie of the ball is crucial when it comes to hitting short shots around the green. While some players opt for a flop shot, Dean Reinmuth suggests using the Texas wedge technique. By using your putter and tapping down on the top of the ball, you can get the ball airborne and roll it up to the flat part of the green. This shot is easier to execute and can save you a shot or two. So next time you find yourself in a tricky lie, give the Texas wedge a try and see how it improves your short game.